All articles within Employment

Court Restricts Non-Solicitation Agreements

FOS’s Fall 2017 newsletter discussed the potential impact on employee non-solicitation agreements of the then-pending Wisconsin Supreme Court case, The Manitowoc Company v. Lanning. The potential is now the reality. On January 19, 2018, the Court decided Lanning, 2018 WI 6. The Court held that a contractual provision restricting a former employee’s solicitation of employees.

Employers – Absenteeism Policies Can Rule

Most employers are faced with employees who call in sick without notice, don’t show up for work, or are unduly absent for other reasons. Employers faced with this problem often wonder when they can legally terminate an employee for such misconduct. This is important, because employees discharged for “misconduct” are generally ineligible to receive unemployment.

Seventh Circuit Narrows Reasonable Accommodation Requirements

Most employers, at some point or another, will receive a request from an employee, claiming to be disabled for a “reasonable accommodation”—an accommodation which helps a disabled employee perform the essential function of his or her job. The Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) requires employers to reasonably accommodate disabled employers to avoid a charge of.

Supreme Court Turns Overtime Analysis Upside Down

The Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) generally requires employers to pay overtime compensation – for over 40 hours worked per week – to covered employees. However, the law specifies 30 exceptions where overtime is not required to be paid to employees performing certain types of duties. One exception is for “any salesman, partsman, or mechanic.

Grand Jury Subpoenas: A Trap for the Unwary, by Jacob Manian

A grand jury subpoena is an indispensable tool for government prosecutors to gather evidence in a criminal investigation. Prosecutors can use a grand jury subpoena to compel individuals to testify under oath before a federal grand jury, or to produce documents or both. Prosecutors can have a grand jury subpoena served on a company as.

NEWER OLDER 1 2 6 7